Tag Archives: memoir

Revealed! Book Club Choices for August. Three Terrific Books.

Because nothing boosts happiness more than a great book, each month, I suggest:

  • one outstanding book about happiness or habits
  • one outstanding work of children’s or young-adult literature–I have a crazy passion for kidlit
  • one eccentric pick–a widely admired and excellent book that I love, yes, but one that may not appeal to everyone

 

Shop at IndieBound, BN.com, or Amazon (I’m an affiliate), or your favorite local bookstore. Or my favorite, visit the library!

For all the books I choose, I love them; I’ve read most of them at least twice if not many times; and they’re widely admired.  Drumroll…

A book about happiness, good habits, or human nature:

Born Standing Up by Steven Martin

Buy from IndieBound; BN.com; Amazon.

 

An outstanding children’s book:

Understood Betsy by Dorothy Canfield

Buy from IndieBound; BN.com; Amazon.

 

An eccentric pick:

The Conversations: Walter Murch and the Art of Editing Film by Michael Ondaatje

Buy from IndieBound; BN.com; Amazon.

 

Some readers have said that they wished that I’d describe and make the case for my book choices, instead of just providing links. I’ve noticed that many times, when someone describes a book to me, I want to read it less. And often, weirdly, the better a book is, the worse it sounds.

Nevertheless, because so many readers have requested it, I’ve decided to give a bit more context for these choices in the book-club newsletter. So if you’d like to know more about why I made these selections, check there. To get that free monthly book-club newsletter, and to make sure you don’ t miss any recommendations, sign up here.

Revealed! Book Club Choices for July. Such Great Books.

Because nothing boosts happiness more than a great book, each month, I suggest:

  • one outstanding book about happiness or habits
  • one outstanding work of children’s or young-adult literature–I have a crazy passion for kidlit
  • one eccentric pick–a widely admired and excellent book that I love, yes, but one that may not appeal to everyone

 

Shop at IndieBound, BN.com, or Amazon (I’m an affiliate), or your favorite local bookstore. Or my favorite, visit the library!

For all the books I choose, I love them; I’ve read most of them at least twice if not many times; and they’re widely admired.  Drumroll…

A book about happiness, good habits, or human nature:

Heartburn by Nora Ephron

Buy from IndieBound; BN.com; Amazon.

 

An outstanding children’s book:

Mr. Popper’s Penguins by Richard and Florence Atwater

Buy from IndieBound; BN.com; Amazon.

 

An eccentric pick:

Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant? by Roz Chast

Buy from IndieBound; BN.com; Amazon.

 

Some readers have said that they wished that I’d describe and make the case for my book choices, instead of just providing links. I’ve noticed that many times, when someone describes a book to me, I want to read it less. And often, weirdly, the better a book is, the worse it sounds.

Nevertheless, because so many readers have requested it, I’ve decided to give a bit more context for these choices in the book-club newsletter. So if you’d like to know more about why I made these selections, check there. To get that free monthly book-club newsletter, and to make sure you don’ t miss any recommendations, sign up here.

If you read last month’s recommendations…what did you think?

A Little Happier: Bill Clinton and Rob Lowe’s Son Give a Lesson in Happiness.

I don’t often read celebrity memoirs, but my sister Elizabeth and others told me that actor Rob Lowe’s Stories I Only Tell My Friends was terrific, so I decided to read it myself.

They’re right — it’s a great book. This episode, in particular, really stuck in my mind. Rob Lowe recounts:

On my last visit to the Clinton White House, I’m standing on the South Lawn with [my wife] Sheryl and the boys talking to the president before he hops onto Marine One. My youngest son, Johnowen, is holding his stuffed frog, Gwee Gwee, which he never lets out of his sight, under any circumstances. It has been his security blanket since he was an infant. But now, he takes it out of his mouth and hands his old, tattered from to the president.

“Well, look at this!” says the president. “Is this for me?” he asks.

Johnowen nods shyly. “For you,” he says in a small voice.

Sheryl and I look at each other in shock.

“Wow, Johnowen!” exclaims Matthew.

“Well, thank you, young man. I bet you didn’t know, but I collect frogs. Have since I was a boy like you….I’ll keep him nice and safe. You can come visit him at the Clinton Library someday.”

How about you? Have you ever been in a situation where you realized that the generous thing to do was to take?

I must admit I’m a little obsessed with this theme. I collect examples. It’s a paradox that fascinates me.

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Happier listening!

Podcast 69: Give a Surprise Treat, a Conversation with Musician Moby, and Double Gold Stars.

It’s time for the next installment of  “Happier with Gretchen Rubin.

Update: Keep sending us those “happiness hacks!” They’re fascinating. To hear about my happiness hack, it’s in episode 64.

Remember,  I’m doing weekly live videos on my Facebook Page about the podcast. To join the conversation, tune in Tuesdays at 1:00 p.m. Eastern.

Try This at Home: Give someone a surprise treat. This is fun!

Here’s the article about The Great Courses: Sarah Max’sBorn in the VCR Era, Great Courses Seeks to Evolve.”

Interview: The iconic musician and writer Moby. His fascinating new memoir is Porcelain.

Here’s the quote from E. B. White that I mention:

“Margaret Mitchell once remarked: ‘It is a full-time job to be the author of ‘Gone With the Wind.’ This remark greatly impressed me, as being an admission of defeat, American style. (Miss Mitchell, incidentally, was not overstating the matter—she never produced another book.)”  –E.B. White, Letters, May 7, 1961

Elizabeth’s Gold Star: Elizabeth has been making stir-fry vegetables for herself.

Gretchen’s Gold Star: I moved my Scent Library to a more convenient spot in the apartment.

Gretchen Rubin scents

As always, thanks to our terrific sponsors

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1pixHappier with Gretchen Rubin - Podcast #69

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Can You Be Both “Home-Loving” and “Adventurous?”

Of the French writer Colette, her husband wrote: “She was both home-loving and adventurous…passionately attached to what she possessed and ready to risk or give it away at any moment.”

–Maurice Goudeket, Close to Colette: An Intimate Portrait of a Woman of Genius

How about you — are you more home-loving, more adventurous, or, like Colette, both? I’m more home-loving.