Tag Archives: memory

Agree? A Song Can Fix a Particular Year in Your Mind.

“Songs last forever. They fix particular years in your mind.”

D.V., Diana Vreeland

I certainly find this to be true in my own life. Like a scent, a song can instantly transport me back to a particular time.

Agree, disagree? What songs have proved particularly powerful in fixing a particular year in your mind?

For Podcast Listeners, Something New! First Mini-Episode to Make You “A Little Happier.”

My sister Elizabeth and I are having so much fun doing our weekly podcast, Happier with Gretchen Rubin.

And I’ve found that there are some powerful ideas about happiness, good habits, and human nature that don’t quite fit the structure of the show.

So, for listeners who’d like to start their weeks with a little boost of happiness, I’ve started doing “A Little Happier.”

Each Monday, I’ll release a little bonus episode — maybe 2-3 minutes long — to help launch the week.

I’ve always been intrigued about how much we love stories, and in the end, how we learn best from stories, so these “A Little Happiers” will feature a story from my life, or something I’ve read or observed, that make a point about happiness. They’ll often feature one of my “Secrets of Adulthood” — the things I’ve learned, with time and experience, about how to be happier.

I love all teaching stories, koans, parables, aphorisms, maxims, epigrams, proverbs, and the like. A Little Happier is another way to explore the power of story and aphorism.

I hope these mini-episodes will help you start your week…a little happier. Let me know what you think!

Agree? “The Best Kind of Laughter Is Laughter Born of a Shared Memory.”

“Playful arguments would become fits of uncontrollable laughter, and, like magic, that experience would be crystallized into a private joke, and the private joke would get boiled down to a simple phrase, which became a souvenir of the entire experience. For years to come, the phrase alone could uncork hours of renewed laughter. And as everyone knows, the best kind of laughter is laughter born of a shared memory.”

–Mindy Kalin, “Some Thoughts on Weddings,” Why Not Me?

How I love the work of Mindy Kaling! Everything she does.

Agree, disagree? There is something special about an inside joke.

Podcast 51: What to Do If You Can’t Remember a Name, Why We Should Plan to Fail, and Adult Coloring Books.

It’s time for the next installment of  “Happier with Gretchen Rubin.

Update: Elizabeth is in her new office in the old Animation Building on the Disney lot. As promised, here’s a photo of the Seven Dwarfs building. If you want to see the trailer for Elizabeth’s new show, The Family, watch here.sevendwarvesbuilding1pix

We got a huge response to episode 48, when we talked about the “Sunday Blues” or “Sunday Dreads.” Listeners suggested many thoughtful solutions for dealing with them.

Try This at Home: Disguise the fact that you can’t remember something important about someone—such as that person’s name. Lots of strategies—and we’re asking for more!

Better Than Before Habits Strategy: The Strategy of Safeguards. It helps us to plan to fail.

Listener Question: Terry from Walnut Creek: “How do I keep up with phone calls and voice mails from family members?” Terry mentions that she’s an “Obliger” in the Four Tendencies framework. If you want to learn more about the Four Tendencies, and take the Quiz to find out your Tendency, go here.

Elizabeth’s Demerit: Despite the fact that Elizabeth lost all her photos when her phone died many months ago, she still doesn’t back up her phone. Bonus demerit: I don’t back up my phone either! Yikes.

Gretchen’s Gold Star: Adult coloring books! I’m going to buy one for myself. Are you a fan?

Bonus: Check out Quiet, the new podcast by Susan Cain, the author of Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can’t Stop Talking, about being the parent of introverted children.

 

As always, thanks to our terrific sponsors

Check out The Great Courses Plus for a wide variety of fascinating courses taught by top professors and experts in their fields. Special offer for our listeners: free access to one of their most popular courses! To get The Fundamentals of Photography for free, go to thegreatcoursesplus.com/happier Limited time.

And check out Stamps.com. Want to avoid post-office pain, and buy and print official U.S. postage for any letter or package, right from your own computer and printer? Visit Stamps.com to sign up for a no-risk trial, plus a $110 bonus offer — just enter the promo code HAPPIER.

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Want to know what to expect from other episodes of the podcast, when you listen toHappier with Gretchen Rubin?” We talk about how to build happier habits into everyday life, as we draw from cutting-edge science, ancient wisdom, lessons from pop culture—and our own experiences (and mistakes).  We’re sisters, so we don’t let each other get away with much!

HAPPIER listening!

Do You Ever Get a Huge Pleasure Just From Looking at a Particular Object? What?

“The rack stood as if it had been there forever across the landscape and lit by the sun with its long shadow behind it, and in harmony with every fold of the field and finally turned into a mere form, a primordial form, even if that was not the word I used then, and it gave me huge pleasure just to look at it. I can still feel the same thing today when I see a hayrack in a photograph from a book, but all that is a thing of the past now…so the feeling of pleasure slips into the feeling that time has passed, that it is very long ago, and the sudden feeling of being old.”

Per Petterson, Out Stealing Horses