Twenty Delightful Aphorisms About Eating from 1825. What Would You Add?

Twenty Delightful Aphorisms About Eating from 1825. What Would You Add?
As part of my research for my book about the five senses,  I've been spending a lot of time thinking about our sense of taste.
I didn't get very far before I ran into the work of Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, who in 1825 published an extraordinarily influential book, The Physiology of Taste, or Meditation on Transcendent Gastronomy (Amazon, Bookshop). It's an odd, fascinating, delightful book of his observations on food and the pleasures of taste.
I love aphorisms, and I love the aphorisms that start this book. It's modestly titled as "prolegomena to his work and eternal basis to the science." (Side note: I've always wanted to write something that I could declare to be a prolegomenon.)

Here are twenty delightful aphorisms about eating (I've bolded my two favorites):

I. The universe would be nothing were it not for life and all that lives must be fed.

II. Animals fill themselves; man eats. The man of mind alone knows how to eat.

III. The destiny of nations depends on the manner in which they are fed.

IV. Tell me what kind of food you eat, and I will tell you what kind of man you are.

V. The Creator, when he obliges man to eat, invites him to do so by appetite, and rewards him by pleasure.

VI. Gourmandise is an act of our judgment, in obedience to which, we grant a preference to things which are agreeable, over those which nave not that quality.

VII. The pleasure of the table belongs to all ages, to all conditions, to all countries, and to all areas; it mingles with all other pleasures, and remains at last to console us for their departure.

VIII. The table is the only place where one does not suffer, from ennui during the first hour.

IX. The discovery of a new dish confers more happiness on humanity, than the discovery of a new star.

X. Those persons who suffer from indigestion, or who become drunk, are utterly ignorant of the true principles of eating and drinking.

XI. The order of food is from the most substantial to the lightest.

XII. The order of drinking is from the mildest to the most foamy and perfumed.

XIII. To say that we should not change our drinks is a heresy; the tongue becomes saturated, and after the third glass yields but an obtuse sensation.

XIV. A dessert without cheese is like a beautiful woman who has lost an eye.

XV. A cook may be taught, but a man who can roast, is born with the faculty.

XVI. The most indispensable quality of a good cook is promptness. It should also be that of the guests.

XVII. To wait too long for a dilatory guest, shows disrespect to those who are punctual.

XVIII. He who receives friends and pays no attention to the repast prepared for them, is not fit to have friends.

XIX. The mistress of the house should always be certain that the coffee be excellent; the master that his liquors be of the first quality.

XX. To invite a person to your house is to take charge of his happiness as long as he be beneath your roof.

Which one is your favorite? What aphorism would you add?

I do love an aphorism! Especially one about the five senses.

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