Tag Archives: quotations

Podcast 79: Revive a Dormant Friendship, a Selection of Yearbook Quotes, and a Gold Star for Making Phone Calls.

It’s time for the next installment of  “Happier with Gretchen Rubin.

Update: It’s almost September, and for many of us, September is the other January. If you get a clean slate, start-over feeling in September, check out my book Happier at Home. I spend a school year — from September though May — going deep into the project of becoming happier at home. If you’re not happy at home, it’s hard to be happy.

Try This at Home: Revive a dormant friendship.

I promised to post a photo of Elizabeth’s Smith and Noble window treatments, but Elizabeth decided that her house just looks too torn up — she doesn’t want to send a photo yet! The window treatments are the only thing accomplished at this point.

Happiness Hack: Todd asks, “Our household receives a lot of reading material in the mail, but we never know when everyone’s done reading something, so don’t know when to throw things away. Any ideas?”

Deep Dive: In episode 74, we suggested the Try This at Home of “Pick a quotation for your senior yearbook page.” Listeners sent in their choices — so many great ones.

Listener Question:  Jenny asks, “Can an Abstainer indulge in chocolate, in moderation?” Jenny is asking about the Abstainer vs. Moderator distinction — and here’s a post about planned exceptions.

Elizabeth’s Demerit: Elizabeth has fallen behind on her pledge on GoodReads to read 75 books this year. If you want to work on the habit of reading more, you can get my one-page “Reading Better Than Before” guide here.

Gretchen’s Gold Star: I managed to make some phone calls.

Remember,  I’m doing weekly live videos on my Facebook Page about the podcast. To join the conversation, check the schedule. Tune in this Tuesday at 7:00 p.m. Eastern.

And if you want to take the Four Tendencies quiz, to find out if you’re an Upholder, Questioner, Obliger, or Rebel, it’s here.

As always, thanks to our terrific sponsors

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Also check out Smith and Noble, the solution for beautiful window treatments. Go to smithandnoble.com/happier for 25% off window treatments and a free in-home design consultation.

And don’t forget to check out Trunk Club. Get hand-picked outfits shipped right to your door–chosen by your very own personal stylist. Go to TrunkClub.com/happier to learn more.

1pixHappier with Gretchen Rubin - Podcast #79

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Want to know what to expect from other episodes of the podcast, when you listen toHappier with Gretchen Rubin?” We talk about how to build happier habits into everyday life, as we draw from cutting-edge science, ancient wisdom, lessons from pop culture—and our own experiences (and mistakes).  We’re sisters, so we don’t let each other get away with much.

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A Little Happier: Sisters Nora and Delia Ephron, and the Intimacy of “I’ll Take Food from Your Fridge.”

I’m a big fan of Nora Ephron’s movies and books (books like Heartburn, Crazy Salad and Scribble Scribble, I Feel Bad about My Neck; movies like When Harry Met, Sleepless in Seattle). In fact, I just recommended Heartburn for my monthly book club (you can sign up for the book club here).

I was re-reading that novel, to learn from it as a writer, because that kind of light, funny, flowing writing is extremely hard to pull off. How does she do it?

I’m also a big fan of the work of her sister, Delia Ephron. I loved her wonderful book of essays, Sister Mother Husband Dog: (Etc.).  The story I tell is something from the essay she wrote about her sister Nora — about the nature of intimacy.

If you want to hear more from Delia Ephron, here’s a post I wrote inspired by the essay “Bakeries” in the same collection: “Discardia,” or How One Moderator Manages to Indulge Moderately. All about the Abstainer/Moderator split.

 

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Happier listening!

A Little Happier: I Read the Short Story that Was Read as Part of My Wedding.

In episode 76, a listener asked for suggestions for great wedding readings, and I promised that I’d read “I Was Trying to Describe You to Someone,” the short story from Richard Brautigan’s wonderful story collection The Revenge of the Lawn that was read at my wedding.

How I love this story! You can read it for yourself here.

Speaking of great quotes, if you’d like to get the “Moment of Happiness,” my free daily email newsletter with a wonderful quotation, sign up here. I love collecting quotations, and choosing the quotation for the daily newsletter is one of my favorite things to do.

Want to get in touch? I love hearing from listeners:

 

Happier listening!

 

Agree? A Song Can Fix a Particular Year in Your Mind.

“Songs last forever. They fix particular years in your mind.”

D.V., Diana Vreeland

I certainly find this to be true in my own life. Like a scent, a song can instantly transport me back to a particular time.

Agree, disagree? What songs have proved particularly powerful in fixing a particular year in your mind?

Do You Struggle to Give Up an Object that Once Served You Well? For Me, My Laptops.

“We conceive…a sort of gratitude for those inanimated objects, which have been the causes of great or frequent pleasure to us. The sailor, who, as soon as he got ashore, should mend [build] his fire with the plank upon which he had just escaped from a shipwreck, would seem to be guilty of an unnatural action. We should expect that he would rather preserve it with care and affection, as a monument that was, in some measure, dear to him.”

–Adam Smith, The Theory of Moral Sentiments

I love this passage, but the old-fashioned language may make it difficult to understand Smith’s point: when some object has done us great service, we’re reluctant to get rid of it.

Do you feel this way? I sure do.

For instance, as I write about in Happier at Home, I found it hard to say good-bye to my old laptops. We’d been through so much together! They’d worked so hard for me, we’d had so many good times together! But the old laptops were starting to take up a lot of space. I took a photograph of them, as a memento, and then sent them on their way.

On my Facebook Live video yesterday, we talked about the issue of managing mementos. Viewers suggested a lot of great hacks.

Mementos serve as important reminders of the people, places, and activities we love, and dear objects make our homes feel more homey. As long as they don’t get too overwhelming!

Do you have a possession that’s no longer useful, but is hard to relinquish, because of the part is has played? A tennis racquet you enjoyed for many years, a dead cell phone…?

Wow, I’m just realizing that in my life as a writer, I really do burn through laptops.